Working from home (Covid 19 edition) (2 Viewers)

Rickboy

Nom Nom Nom Nom.. me hungry for a SuperBowl
Platinum VIP Contributor
Joined
Jan 22, 2000
Messages
14,141
Reaction score
3,659
Age
48
Location
Colorado
Online
Nice Rickboy. Looks like one of those tabletops that raise and lower. I had those when I was at Cisco. I found myself standing more than sitting to work.
Yea, that's a GeekDesk. I've had it for almost 15 years and it still works. I kind wish it would break so I can get something new.. haha.. The top of the desk is from IKEA.
 

Rickboy

Nom Nom Nom Nom.. me hungry for a SuperBowl
Platinum VIP Contributor
Joined
Jan 22, 2000
Messages
14,141
Reaction score
3,659
Age
48
Location
Colorado
Online
If you’re new to working from home, you really need to plan your day out, every day. I used to spend the first 30 mins writing down my plan tasks. The beginning of that would be incomplete tasks from the day before and moving on from there. I also block time off on my calendar for completing tasks. I also schedule in lunch and breaks.

when it comes to your calendar, you have to realize that YOU own it. You have the ability to turn down meeting invites. Too often I get sales reps taking up space on my calendar when otherthings are already planned. There is a gray area here but I generally decline those meetings or propose a new time. I do give special consideration for meetings that are customer facing, or if the host contacts me in advance.
 

Mr. Blue Sky

Still P***ed at Yoko
VIP Contributor
Joined
Jun 6, 2006
Messages
22,590
Reaction score
10,513
Age
46
Location
Between the Moon and New York City
Online
I've worked from home for 14 years. AMA. ;)


Same here.. well, almost- about 12 or 13 yrs for me... i feel like working from home is the best kept secret in the business world; or at least it used to be, up until the past couple of weeks... Although i have a feeling that a lot of people who are new to virtual officing will ge the impression that it’s awful, becuase right now we’re in a time where everyone is stuck, and cant break jump their day.. usually i can wake up, get some work done, go get a workout at the gym, come back home and work some more, go out meet a friend for lunch, come back and work, maybe run out to meet a client or two, then back home to work at night... Now, it’’s home & work 24/7, so not a real fair prism at all to view working from home, there is zero balance.

All that said, i was talking to a buddy yesterday who said he’s always hated working from home as opposed to going to an office; said he misses talking about sports with his boss, and catching up with his coworkers about family stuff.. As for me , i look at going to the office as dealing with office politics, water coooler BS and horrible traffic commutes.. Thank god we are all different.


and what Rickboy mentioned about ‘owning your calndar’- absolutely true.. make it work for you, not the other way around.. learn to say no, or you‘ll never be off of work.
 

zeetes

yo’ robbie fordz fo lyfe
VIP Subscribing Member
Joined
Jan 2, 2010
Messages
15,139
Reaction score
14,423
Location
yellow brick road
Online
working from home allows you to watch documentaries like cop land. highly productive.

actually, i am glad my last project ended. i'd be on call for a larger energy company.

instead, i get to sleep :) though, as a bipolar 2 individual, this is probably the worst thing for me. whatevs. quarantine.
 

Loose Cannon

Tangibles
VIP Contributor
Joined
May 26, 2002
Messages
28,135
Reaction score
5,579
Location
Austin, TX
Offline
If you’re new to working from home, you really need to plan your day out, every day. I used to spend the first 30 mins writing down my plan tasks. The beginning of that would be incomplete tasks from the day before and moving on from there. I also block time off on my calendar for completing tasks. I also schedule in lunch and breaks.

when it comes to your calendar, you have to realize that YOU own it. You have the ability to turn down meeting invites. Too often I get sales reps taking up space on my calendar when otherthings are already planned. There is a gray area here but I generally decline those meetings or propose a new time. I do give special consideration for meetings that are customer facing, or if the host contacts me in advance.
Good advice here.

I'm about 10 years in to WFH. Because I do consulting, I always clock my billable hours. What helped me really start to get good about productivity was when I decided to clock all of my time (billable hours, sales/marketing, books/housekeeping, emails, goofing off/surfing the web, etc.). Then I shoot for a certain amount of "real work" hours per day, which is basically all time actually working, whether on a project or on my business itself. Excludes breaks, surfing the web, etc.

If you go through that exercise, you'll be amazed at how little actual real work you do in a day. I use clockify.me. Right now I shoot for 6 real work hours per day. It's really, really tough. I'd be willing to bet in a few jobs early in my career that I didn't care much about (mostly low-to-mid level IT jobs), I clocked an hour or so of real work per day.

It also gave me a new outlook on meetings. Now a boring hour long meeting is an hour of free, easy banked time.
 

zeetes

yo’ robbie fordz fo lyfe
VIP Subscribing Member
Joined
Jan 2, 2010
Messages
15,139
Reaction score
14,423
Location
yellow brick road
Online
sooooooo bored.

i normally spend my weeks traveling to clients, creating powerpoints, and answering stupid questions. 95% is with c-class employees. oh, and this is with forbes 500 and below. morons hired probably due to nepotism, at it's finest.

i was already bored dealing with forking morons, but sitting at home playing with my ding-a-ling, i'm seriously at my wit's end.
 

zeetes

yo’ robbie fordz fo lyfe
VIP Subscribing Member
Joined
Jan 2, 2010
Messages
15,139
Reaction score
14,423
Location
yellow brick road
Online
sooooooo bored.

i normally spend my weeks traveling to clients, creating powerpoints, and answering stupid questions. 95% is with c-class employees. oh, and this is with forbes 500 and below. morons hired probably due to nepotism, at it's finest.

i was already bored dealing with forking morons, but sitting at home playing with my ding-a-ling, i'm seriously at my wit's end.
though, i am thankful to not travel.
 

zeetes

yo’ robbie fordz fo lyfe
VIP Subscribing Member
Joined
Jan 2, 2010
Messages
15,139
Reaction score
14,423
Location
yellow brick road
Online
These are my favorite kinds of clients. They're easily impressed.
i hate them. i don't like people. i absolutely hate people in a position of power that don't understand simple concepts.

i do not get invited to a few meetings because apparently i can't bite my tongue.
 

Rickboy

Nom Nom Nom Nom.. me hungry for a SuperBowl
Platinum VIP Contributor
Joined
Jan 22, 2000
Messages
14,141
Reaction score
3,659
Age
48
Location
Colorado
Online
Good advice here.

I'm about 10 years in to WFH. Because I do consulting, I always clock my billable hours. What helped me really start to get good about productivity was when I decided to clock all of my time (billable hours, sales/marketing, books/housekeeping, emails, goofing off/surfing the web, etc.). Then I shoot for a certain amount of "real work" hours per day, which is basically all time actually working, whether on a project or on my business itself. Excludes breaks, surfing the web, etc.

If you go through that exercise, you'll be amazed at how little actual real work you do in a day. I use clockify.me. Right now I shoot for 6 real work hours per day. It's really, really tough. I'd be willing to bet in a few jobs early in my career that I didn't care much about (mostly low-to-mid level IT jobs), I clocked an hour or so of real work per day.

It also gave me a new outlook on meetings. Now a boring hour long meeting is an hour of free, easy banked time.
When I’m really focused, I usually get all my work done in a couple hours. So, if I don’t have any conf calls, I simply goof off or hang out with my wife.

When it comes to meetings, a lot of the time I’m the one presenting. Other meetings are for training so i don’t get to goof off much. However if its just something I don’t have any involvement in, I will multi-task to get other work done.
 

Rickboy

Nom Nom Nom Nom.. me hungry for a SuperBowl
Platinum VIP Contributor
Joined
Jan 22, 2000
Messages
14,141
Reaction score
3,659
Age
48
Location
Colorado
Online
A few other things.

This may not apply to you fellas WFH in the short term but treat yourself right. Get a GOOD chair. Get a GOOD monitor. Get a GOOD Mouse. Etc., etc.,.

If you like coffee, get a GREAT coffee maker. Otherwise you’ll go to the local coffee shop and spend too much money. I LOVE my Americanos. Starbucks charges $3 for a grande Americano. Count 50cents to a buck for a tip and then taxes and that cuppa joe gets expensive. I spent $1200 on a GOOD espresso maker and learned to make good espresso. I spent extra for a good grinder. I guestimate it paid for itself in about a year and a half.

There is no such thing as too large when it comes to monitors. I had this 34” LG monitor for 5 years and I‘m thinking of upgrading to a 49” Dell (gotta keep Uncle Dell happy). I can have spreadsheets, Powerpoints, and a couple browser windows open. Of course, with a Mac, switching between multiple desktops is a breeze and lets me get more done.
 

Create an account or login to comment

You must be a member in order to leave a comment

Create account

Create an account on our community. It's easy!

Log in

Already have an account? Log in here.

Users Who Are Viewing This Thread (Users: 0, Guests: 2)



Headlines

Top Bottom