Police Shootings / Possible Abuse Threads [merged] (1 Viewer)

CNN) — Aurora police officer Nathan Woodyard was found not guilty by a Colorado jury Monday on all charges related to the death of Elijah McClain, an unarmed 23-year-old Black man who died after he was wrestled to the ground by police and injected with ketamine by paramedics in 2019.

Woodyard had pleaded not guilty to charges of reckless manslaughter and criminally negligent homicide in connection with McClain’s death. The officer remains suspended from the department without pay, pending the outcome of the trial…..


The Colorado officer who stopped Elijah McClain in 2019 and placed him in a neck hold was reinstated to the Aurora police department and will receive $200,000 in back pay, city officials said on Monday.

Nathan Woodyard’s “reintegration” into the police force comes weeks after a jury found him not guilty of manslaughter and criminally negligent homicide.

Woodyard had been suspended without pay for two years since he was indicted for his role in the death of the 23-year-old.

An Aurora spokesperson said city law mandated that the department offer him his job back after his acquittal in the criminal trial, and that he would receive $212,546 to cover the salary from his leave.…..

 
 
A crackle, a chirp and the voice of a dispatcher describing an unfolding crisis in rapid-fire code. For nearly a century, New York City police have communicated about crime and catastrophe via radio broadcasts on public channels.

And for journalists and the public, these dispatches have been a reliable way to get real-time knowledge of what’s happening in one of the world’s most chaotic cities.

Now the NYPD is encrypting these channels for the first time in its history – an “upgrade” expected to cost hundreds of millions of dollars before it’s completed in December 2024. Over the summer, police began scrambling the channels for certain precincts, leaving anyone listening in with white noise.

The NYPD’s chief of information technology, Ruben Beltran, told the New York City council last week the move was designed to “stop giving the bad guys our game plan in terms of how we’re trying to apprehend them”.

That messaging has been echoed by the New York mayor, Eric Adams, a former cop: “We can’t give a leg up to these bad guys.” Beltran also cited ambulance chasers and unauthorized interruptions as reasons to encrypt; meanwhile, some California law enforcement agencies are encrypting their broadcasts in an effort to protect victims’ and witnesses’ personal information.

But the New Yorkers who have tuned into their radio scanners for years say something important will be lost when the channels disappear – including a way to keep tabs on the NYPD, recipient of more than 4,200 misconduct complaints this year.

Here are four of their stories.

The photojournalist: ‘Cops need checks and balances’​

Todd Maisel, contributing editor at amNewYork……..
I see encryption as a betrayal. The cops have been my friends. I’ve covered for them, I’ve been out there for them, I’ve made them look good. I showed up not just at the crime scenes, but the Christmas parties.

There’s plenty of misdeeds that they do, too. We can go back to Eric Garner, where we picked up cryptic information over the police scanner and sensed something was wrong. And a reporter went out there and got the video of Garner’s killing before the police could hide it.

They’re human beings, armed with guns, with incredible power. They need checks and balances. If encryption happens, you’re not going to know what goes on at night. We can’t make decisions based just on what social media tells us. The NYPD doesn’t always tell you what happened, sometimes for hours, days, or at all. So who are they to decide what’s the news?……..



 
A young man hangs out on a street corner in Midtown Manhattan every day outside the entrance of a big chain restaurant. He shadowboxes and talks to himself, and beneath him are poster boards with scrawled conspiracy theories. The restaurant’s manager worries the man could be scaring off customers and calls 911.

Should the responding police officer remove the man to a hospital, forcing him if he refuses?

This is a scenario from the training materials for a new 24/7 hotline touted by Mayor Eric Adams and run by New York City’s public hospital system, which offers police officers on-demand guidance on whether to involuntarily hospitalize someone who appears mentally ill.

Adams, a former transit cop, announced the hotline last November as part of a controversial directive to expand the police’s authority to perform the removals, pledging that the hotline would be staffed by psychiatrists, social workers, and clinicians who “will provide guidance to police officers who encounter individuals in psychiatric crisis”.

But the number of police officers who have consulted the hotline since it went live nearly half a year ago? Zero, according to public records disclosed last week by NYC Health + Hospitals, the municipal health system, and first reported by Politico……..

 
A crackle, a chirp and the voice of a dispatcher describing an unfolding crisis in rapid-fire code. For nearly a century, New York City police have communicated about crime and catastrophe via radio broadcasts on public channels.

And for journalists and the public, these dispatches have been a reliable way to get real-time knowledge of what’s happening in one of the world’s most chaotic cities.

Now the NYPD is encrypting these channels for the first time in its history – an “upgrade” expected to cost hundreds of millions of dollars before it’s completed in December 2024. Over the summer, police began scrambling the channels for certain precincts, leaving anyone listening in with white noise.

The NYPD’s chief of information technology, Ruben Beltran, told the New York City council last week the move was designed to “stop giving the bad guys our game plan in terms of how we’re trying to apprehend them”.

That messaging has been echoed by the New York mayor, Eric Adams, a former cop: “We can’t give a leg up to these bad guys.” Beltran also cited ambulance chasers and unauthorized interruptions as reasons to encrypt; meanwhile, some California law enforcement agencies are encrypting their broadcasts in an effort to protect victims’ and witnesses’ personal information.

But the New Yorkers who have tuned into their radio scanners for years say something important will be lost when the channels disappear – including a way to keep tabs on the NYPD, recipient of more than 4,200 misconduct complaints this year.

Here are four of their stories.

The photojournalist: ‘Cops need checks and balances’​

Todd Maisel, contributing editor at amNewYork……..
I see encryption as a betrayal. The cops have been my friends. I’ve covered for them, I’ve been out there for them, I’ve made them look good. I showed up not just at the crime scenes, but the Christmas parties.

There’s plenty of misdeeds that they do, too. We can go back to Eric Garner, where we picked up cryptic information over the police scanner and sensed something was wrong. And a reporter went out there and got the video of Garner’s killing before the police could hide it.

They’re human beings, armed with guns, with incredible power. They need checks and balances. If encryption happens, you’re not going to know what goes on at night. We can’t make decisions based just on what social media tells us. The NYPD doesn’t always tell you what happened, sometimes for hours, days, or at all. So who are they to decide what’s the news?……..



I see good reason to encrypt those conversations with a stipulation they should all be recorded and stored for public requests as well.

I don't think radio broadcasts are any kind of public right. Radio is a tool used by police and honestly I'm surprised it's taken this long for em to encrypt.
 
I see good reason to encrypt those conversations with a stipulation they should all be recorded and stored for public requests as well.

I don't think radio broadcasts are any kind of public right. Radio is a tool used by police and honestly I'm surprised it's taken this long for em to encrypt.
Both sides have valid points

As the article says we only know about Eric Garner because someone heard about it on the broadcast as it was going down
 
A young man hangs out on a street corner in Midtown Manhattan every day outside the entrance of a big chain restaurant. He shadowboxes and talks to himself, and beneath him are poster boards with scrawled conspiracy theories. The restaurant’s manager worries the man could be scaring off customers and calls 911.

Should the responding police officer remove the man to a hospital, forcing him if he refuses?

What? Obviously not. Ya shoot 'im. If he's white, maybe you tase him a few times first, see if he calms down.
 
An Alabama police officer is on administrative leave after video showed her repeatedly using a stun gun on a handcuffed man while he screamed and cried.


In a viral 45-second video clip, a police officer, who is White, is seen leading 24-year-old Micah Washington, who is Black and in handcuffs, to a cruiser and pushing his head against the hood during the Dec. 2 traffic stop.
Washington appears to cooperate with the officer.


The events leading up to the beginning of the video are not shown, but Washington is seen telling the Reform city police officer that he had a gun.

After retrieving the gun, the officer set it on the car hood, and said, “Oh, yeah.”


He asked her, “What you saying, ‘Oh, yeah’ for?”
The officer then discharges her stun gun multiple times into his back, instructing him to “be quiet,” followed by several expletives.


Washington wails out “Okay!” and “Oh, my God!” as the officer continues to stun him.


“You want it again?” the officer asks…….


 

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