Police Shootings / Possible Abuse Threads [merged] (2 Viewers)

I also believe if an officer violates criminal law he loses immunity. I do know if they violate your rights they lose immunity.
They sometimes do, but clearly, a lot of them manage to hide behind that for whatever reasons. I think irresponsible cops need to he held accountable, and I imagine you want this as well.
 
Why not sue the officer/officers that are responsible?

I do know if they violate your rights they lose immunity.

Here is the argument against it. The language is emotionally loaded but cases I've heard so far have matched.

This judicial doctrine, invented by the Supreme Court in the 1960s, protects state and local officials from liability, even when they act unlawfully, so long as their actions do not violate “clearly established law.” In practice, this legal standard is a huge hurdle for civil rights plaintiffs because it generally requires them to identify not just a clear legal rule but a prior case with functionally identical facts.
 
A Mississippi mom could lose custody of her three children nearly a year after a police officer shot and wounded her 11-year-old son in their home.
I like getting Mississippi news bc it lets me see what La. will look like in about a year
It’s like having a very erp derp crystal ball
 
Los Angeles County sheriff’s officials concluded that two deputies acted within department policy when they confronted and one of them shot Isaias Cervantes, a mentally disabled man in his home in 2021. A corrective action plan (at least, the portion that is public) identified nothing in sheriff's policies or procedures that needs to be changed to prevent a similar shooting.

So it seems incongruous that county lawyers are suggesting that the Board of Supervisors on Tuesday sign off on an astounding $25 million to settle a lawsuit brought on behalf of Cervantes, who was paralyzed as a result of the March 31, 2021, shooting.

That’s a huge payout, even for Los Angeles County, which spent $257 million on legal settlements and judgments last year. More than half of that amount was attributable to lawsuits against the Sheriff’s Department. Liabilities that run that high signal serious problems in county policies and employee conduct. They should be accompanied by meaningful improvements.

But the summary corrective action plan notes no department-wide or systemic changes, and no response beyond reminding personnel of department protocols.

Department use-of-force investigators and county officials cited problems at several stages of the response, including the failure of desk personnel to ask about the nature of Cervantes’ mental impairment and the failure to send a Mental Evaluation Team as part of the response.

Once deputies arrived on the scene, though, they were deemed to have done nothing officially wrong. Similar conclusions have been reached in many other cases, in L.A. and around the country, in which families called for assistance with a mentally disabled or disturbed relative, beginning a series of entirely foreseeable events that concluded with law enforcement officers killing or seriously injuring the person they were there ostensibly to help.

The Cervantes case was unusual in that the shooting victim survived. To add insult to serious injury, the Sheriff’s Department asked the district attorney to charge Cervantes with assault and resisting arrest — although there was no arrest. Prosecutors declined. Nor did they charge the deputies.

The Board of Supervisors generally signs off on lawsuit settlements, even huge ones like the Cervantes case, without comment to the public. That may satisfy the Sheriff’s Department and county lawyers, but it leaves taxpayers holding the bag without assurance that the county will try to prevent a recurrence. And it exposes a continuing gulf between citizens who call for service and law enforcement personnel who respond...........



 
 
he should have been arrested for breaking an entering and trespassing..
 
Dexter Reed’s mother remembers the last time she saw her son alive. “Mom, I’m going for a ride,” he told her, before heading out in the car that he had purchased just three days earlier.


Reed, 26, was killed that same day, when tactical-unit police officers fired 96 bullets at him within 41 seconds, according to Chicago’s Civilian Office of Police Accountability, or COPA, which investigates allegations of police misconduct and police shootings.

“He was just riding around in his car,” Dexter’s mother, Nicole Banks, told Fox 32 Chicago on Tuesday, as she broke down in tears. “They killed him.”


COPA released video footage of the shooting Tuesday and said its investigation of the “officers’ use of deadly force” on March 21 remains ongoing.

The Chicago Police Department told CNN that it was cooperating with COPA’s investigation and that it “cannot make a determination on this shooting until all the facts are known and this investigation has concluded.”

The department did not immediately respond for a request for comment from The Washington Post.

According to COPA, police stopped Reed “for purportedly not wearing a seatbelt.” In several body-cam videos, multiple officers can be seen exiting an unmarked vehicle and surrounding Reed’s car, which had tinted windows…….

 
Dexter Reed’s mother remembers the last time she saw her son alive. “Mom, I’m going for a ride,” he told her, before heading out in the car that he had purchased just three days earlier.


Reed, 26, was killed that same day, when tactical-unit police officers fired 96 bullets at him within 41 seconds, according to Chicago’s Civilian Office of Police Accountability, or COPA, which investigates allegations of police misconduct and police shootings.

“He was just riding around in his car,” Dexter’s mother, Nicole Banks, told Fox 32 Chicago on Tuesday, as she broke down in tears. “They killed him.”


COPA released video footage of the shooting Tuesday and said its investigation of the “officers’ use of deadly force” on March 21 remains ongoing.

The Chicago Police Department told CNN that it was cooperating with COPA’s investigation and that it “cannot make a determination on this shooting until all the facts are known and this investigation has concluded.”

The department did not immediately respond for a request for comment from The Washington Post.

According to COPA, police stopped Reed “for purportedly not wearing a seatbelt.” In several body-cam videos, multiple officers can be seen exiting an unmarked vehicle and surrounding Reed’s car, which had tinted windows…….


Body-worn camera footage released by COPA on Tuesday shows that Reed, 26, resisted orders to roll down his car windows and open the door. As officers shouted at him, Reed opened fire and struck one of the officers in the hand, COPA said.
 
I have read he had felony gun charges and fired at cops first.
 

Create an account or login to comment

You must be a member in order to leave a comment

Create account

Create an account on our community. It's easy!

Log in

Already have an account? Log in here.

Users who are viewing this thread

    Back
    Top Bottom