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David Robbins

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I miss your instruction. I have never really played much football so I get confused on some terms. What is 21 personnel and other personnel concepts. Routes. What is a rub route and a dig route and so forth. On defense you have 2 lb's compared to 3. Can you please clear these things up for me. Give me the football lessons I never got. Thanks bro.
 
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David Robbins

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Yeah, also wondering if they need to adjust playcalling to fit his skill set. Does someone else fill the joker role for Taysom? Maybe Harris? He's a bit smaller, but the speed and shiftiness seems like it would be a good fit.
Callaway might also be good in that role. He's a punt returner so he's shifty
 

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Great, great thread.

And TCU Dan that cerebral comment is spot on. That is one of the reasons so many WR's drafted in the 1st round flame out. They are athletic freaks, workout warriors who simply don't have the skill and instincts to really learn the position in the NFL....
 

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What is a joker. Also what is the difference between a scat back and a regular back.
A 'joker' generally speaking is just a name for a versatile offensive skill player. It's like calling a nickel hybrid safety a 'dog' or a 'bandit'. It's not an actual position, it's more of role. A guy who can line up in the slot, at H-back, at RB, flexed out wide, who you can motion in for jet sweeps, hit with screens, etc.

Joker isn't an actual position. It's a role.

Calling someone a 'scat back' just means a smaller, shiftier back. Like a Darren Sproles.
 

DaveXA

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Great, great thread.

And TCU Dan that cerebral comment is spot on. That is one of the reasons so many WR's drafted in the 1st round flame out. They are athletic freaks, workout warriors who simply don't have the skill and instincts to really learn the position in the NFL....
Yeah, WRs have always been more of a crapshoot than most other positions in terms of the draft. It's interesting to see how well Jordan Jefferson is doing in the Vikes' offense. LSU seems to do a great job preparing their skill players for the NFL.
 
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David Robbins

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A 'joker' generally speaking is just a name for a versatile offensive skill player. It's like calling a nickel hybrid safety a 'dog' or a 'bandit'. It's not an actual position, it's more of role. A guy who can line up in the slot, at H-back, at RB, flexed out wide, who you can motion in for jet sweeps, hit with screens, etc.

Joker isn't an actual position. It's a role.

Calling someone a 'scat back' just means a smaller, shiftier back. Like a Darren Sproles.
Yea, that's what I thought on the scat back. So, any position can really be called a joker.
 
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David Robbins

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I’m obviously not Dan, but I’m not sure how active he’s been on here lately so I’ll also give it a shot at explaining a few things to the best of my knowledge.

A dig route is a route where the WR runs a few yards downfield (about 5 to 10 yards or so depending on what the play design calls for) and then cuts 90° towards the middle of the field and runs parallel to the line of scrimmage. It’s also commonly referred to as a “drag” or an “in” which is as its name infers, an inward breaking route (towards the middle part of the field, i.e. the hash marks) as opposed to an “out” route, where it’s breaking to the sideline.

Here’s a nice little diagram of the “route tree” to give a visual description if needed...


A “rub” route isn’t specifically a route but an offensive concept. It’s a combination of multiple routes run by more than one eligible receiver that are designed to gain separation from the defender in man coverage; essentially a “pick play” like in basketball. For example, with the defense in man coverage, you line up two WR’s on the same side of the field and the outside WR runs a slant (a short, inward breaking route), while the inside WR runs a flat (a short, outward breaking route) where the two players’ paths will cross. The inside WR would run his route where his path after he cuts outward will impede the CB (even just slightly) that’s trying to cover the outside WR and freeing him to make a catch and run, hence “rubbing off” the CB. It doesn’t have to consist of only a combination of a slant and a flat route, many different routes can be used in a rub concept, just that as long as the routes are runin close enough proximity where one of the offensive players can affect the defenders coverage of the other WR, or even better, if the offensive players can make the defenders run into each other.

As for the 3 LB vs. 2 LB’s, typically when there are 3 LB’s on the field for a 4-3 defense, the defense is in its “base personnel” (4 DL, 3 LB, and 4 DB). Sometimes they’ll sub out a LB (usually the SAM, or strong side LB) for an additional defensive back which is referred to as a “nickel” defense since you now have 5 defensive backs on the field. There are two main forms of nickel defense: “regular nickel” (where they’ll bring in a 3rd CB to play the slot) and “big nickel” (where they’ll bring in a 3rd safety instead of a CB, like we do with Gardner-Johnson).

I saw TribuneUK knocked out the personnel question pretty well, so I’ll only further add on to his post.

As he said, essentially the personnel numbers tell you how many RB’s and how many TE’s are on the field at any given time. And since there are only 5 eligible receivers on the field at any given time (excluding the QB), you can deduce how many WR’s are also on the field with the personnel number...
  • 10 personnel: 1 RB, 0 TE, 4 WR
  • 11 personnel: 1 RB, 1 TE, 3 WR
  • 12 personnel: 1 RB, 2 TE, 2 WR
  • 13 personnel: 1 RB, 3 TE, 1 WR
  • 20 personnel: 2 RB, 0 TE, 3 WR
  • 21 personnel: 2 RB, 1 TE, 2 WR
  • 22 personnel: 2 RB, 2 TE, 1 WR
  • 23 personnel: 2 RB, 3 TE, 0 WR
And so on and so forth, some of those are more commonly seen than others. But essentially the lower those 2 numbers are, the more WR’s on the field, such as “00 personnel” which is 5 WR’s on the field.
Well I know some routes like a slant and a crossing route. I know the comeback route and the go route. But the others escapes me.
 
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David Robbins

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And what about base defenses. I know the basics. 43, 34, and 46. I know they are called will (weak side), Mike (inside or middle) and Sam (strong side). What I don't know is what a 46 actually is.
 

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And what about base defenses. I know the basics. 43, 34, and 46. I know they are called will (weak side), Mike (inside or middle) and Sam (strong side). What I don't know is what a 46 actually is.
46 is named after Doug Plank who played safety for the Chicago bears back in the 70s and 80s. It’s having that strong safety play in the box kinda of a 4-4 defense. He wore 46 so that’s why they called it that lol. He was my coach down in Orlando with Predators. He’s a really cool guy and has lots of stories of his playing days
 
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David Robbins

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I thought cover 0 was man. And, from rereading this thread, I now know why Carl Smith was a bad oc. He obviously never studied under Dan and deuce. Lol
 

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Yeah, WRs have always been more of a crapshoot than most other positions in terms of the draft. It's interesting to see how well Jordan Jefferson is doing in the Vikes' offense. LSU seems to do a great job preparing their skill players for the NFL.
I actually called this one. JJ doesn't have the highest ceiling of the WR's drafted last year but he is one of the most NFL ready WRs I've ever seen coming out of college. He runs all the routes exceptionally well, he can line up in the slot or outside, incredibly consistent hands, and most importantly he knows where to be....all the time. Oh and like most LSU WR's he can block.....

Oh and Clemson's DC's (I'm sure after watching the LSU-OK game film) main goal in the 1st half was to try and blanket JJ....to risk leaving Chase (the Belintikoff winner) single covered. To me that is the ultimate sign of respect from a great coach.....I didn't think we would ever have a better tandem than Landry and Beckham but JJ and Chase I feel were better.
 
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Well I know some routes like a slant and a crossing route. I know the comeback route and the go route. But the others escapes me.
All good! The more you see the routes, the easier you typically remember them.
What is a 3x1 or 2x2.
3x1 and 2x2 is how many eligible players are lined up on each side of the field. 3 on one side and 1 on the other, 2 on each side, ect.

I thought cover 0 was man. And, from rereading this thread, I now know why Carl Smith was a bad oc. He obviously never studied under Dan and deuce. Lol
That’s correct, Cover 0 is man coverage. It’s a blitz where there’s no safety help deep, each of the 5 eligible receivers are covered by 1 defender and the remaining 6 defenders are rushing the passer.
 
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David Robbins

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What about all the different coverages. Man, cover 2, cover z zone, cover 3 zone. Nickel and dime. High safety. My God there are so many. I thought I knew them all then you hear cover z zone. Dang
 

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